Cricket World Cup Champions Out For 85 At Lord’s In one Session By Irish Bowlers

Ireland played England for 85 on a magical first morning at the Lord’s before the hosts battled back at the end of the match to fight their way into the competition.

Ireland made its long format debut and was completely unimpressed in the opening session. It played with incision and accuracy to eradicate the hosts at record levels. Never before had England lost all 10 gates before lunch at the Home of Cricket, and never before had they played such a short, complete inning there.

Tim Murtagh, who practices Middlesex County Cricket here, was the architect of Ireland’s success. He claimed 5/13 – Ireland’s maiden test for men – and he scored the fewest runs in a spell that earned a place in the Lord’s honor panel.

He was assisted by debutant Mark Adair, who claimed three wickets, including Joe Denly, England’s top scorer, whose dismissal triggered a collapse of six wickets for seven runs, and England captain Joe Root. Boyd Rankin was also successful with two against his former team.

England was drunk and the cat continued after the break. Captain William Porterfield and James McCollum pitched the platform, and though Andy Balbirnie and Paul Stirling had not yet crossed 20, they made a win fifty and Ireland had a head start, with eight wickets still in the bank.

Only in the closing session, the hosts have finally teamed up. Stuart Broad created the opening, removing Paul Stirling LBW and Olly Stone, who broke through on the debut with two wickets in an over, bowled at a frightening pace and pushed the ball late. Ireland tried to dig in, but the hosts continued to cut and were eventually fended off for 207 to secure a lead of 122.

Kevin O’Brien was the only batsman to offer a long resistance and hit 73 balls for his unbeaten 28, while Murtagh entertained in his fun 10-ball 16 game. The day of the release of Ireland left only a little more than 10 minutes left and England was forced to start her innings for the second time. The night watchman Jack Leach has managed to survive, but England still has a lot to do when it comes to winning from behind.

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