Zsanett Jakabfi: I’m trying to bring German mindset to Hungary

This is a feeling that Zsanett Jakabfi fully agrees with. The Hungarian-born midfielder, who is already one of Wolfsburg’s longest-serving players, extended her contract by another year in early 2020 to ensure that she would play her twelfth season for the she-wolf.

About Zsanett Jakabfi

Jakabfi was only 19 when she moved to Germany and the Bundesliga in 2009. When asked why she had remained so loyal to Wolfsburg, she answered clearly: “It’s the atmosphere in this team,” she said in an interview, “but also the professionalism and the journey that many of us have done with the club – maybe not every player, but some of us. It makes it a very special place for me and also explains why I was here for a long time. “

This trip has led to 13 titles: two UEFA Women’s Champions League triumphs, five Bundesliga medals, and six DFB Cup trophies. If Jakabfi finds her way, she will add three more successes to her long list of honors this season.

The she-wolf is still contested in all major competitions and does not appear to be affected by the corona virus interruption. In fact, since resuming the women’s Bundesliga season on May 29, Wolfsburg has simply started where it left off.

“We have a lot of ambition and clear goals and, despite the exceptional circumstances, we have never lost sight of these goals. That is exactly what distinguishes our team,” said the eight-time Hungarian footballer of the year.

“Of course, things don’t always go according to plan on the pitch. It is very rare that we take a three-month break and understandably everyone lacks training, but we do our best and try to play.” Nevertheless, we were able to win these games so convincingly. “

Despite her team’s victories in the Bundesliga and their march to the semi-finals of the DFB Cup, this unusual situation also gave Jakabfi reason to think. “We haven’t had the freedom to visit our families,” she said. “What if something had happened? Of course, you shouldn’t think so, but quarantining alone in Wolfsburg without a family was a bit difficult,” added the midfielder.

“The trick is to get something positive out of every difficult situation. I think there were some positive aspects. We had time, so to speak, to slow down – time to think about all sorts of things or to spend time with our partners. There it is Always things that you try to do better when you hear how many terrible things are going on in the world. They automatically become more contemplative, and I also think that this time will lead to changes and that we will learn things to appreciate more. “

Jakabfi also appreciates the experience she has gained in Germany. This experience also benefited the Hungarian national team, for whom they made their international debut in 2007. The team currently ranks 43rd in the FIFA / Coca-Cola Women’s World Ranking and third in Group F of the UEFA Women’s EURO qualification.

“Progress has definitely been made, albeit not to the extent that we had imagined in Hungary – especially with regard to the national team,” said Jakabfi when asked where Hungarian women’s football should go. “The league and the national team have certainly become much more professional. We now have coaches who do the job full-time. These are steps that will help improve the game for women in Hungary. However, we still have a lot to do to get there will.” world-class at some point. “

The 30-year-old grew up footballing in Germany and would like to do her part to promote this process. “I try to pass on what I have learned, experienced, and learned here in Hungary, especially in Wolfsburg,” she explained. “I also try to pass on a little bit of this German way of thinking, which is about having a fighting spirit and never giving up – it’s about robustness and total determination.”

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